FAQs

Direct Spark Ignition Systems

Why are my gas fire pit flames coming from my burner large, yellow, and dirty?

Direct Spark Ignition (DSI) burners are set up specifically for one fuel type (liquid propane or natural gas) and to operate as cleanly and efficiently on that one fuel. If the flames are extremely large and bright, and there is soot at the tips of the flames, the burner is most likely set up for natural gas but liquid propane is being supplied to it. Verify what gas type the burner was designed to operate on and what gas is being supplied to the system. A natural gas DSI burner will have a sticker on the control box that says: “This control has been converted for use with natural gas.”

If the fuel type of the burner and the fuel being supplied to the burner match, the unit may be receiving gas at a higher pressure than the unit is rated to handle. OGC DSI Burners are rated to a maximum of ½ PSI (14 in. WC) gas pressure and issues with gas supply should be handled by a licensed gas professional. Contact OGC for more information.

Why are my gas fire pit flames coming from my burner very low and blue?

Direct Spark Ignition (DSI) burners are set up specifically for one fuel type (liquid propane or natural gas) and to operate as cleanly and efficiently on that one fuel. If the flames are very low and blue it is possible that the burner is set up for liquid propane but natural gas is being supplied to it. Verify what gas the burner was designed to operate on and what gas is being supplied to the system.

If the fuel type of the burner and the fuel being supplied to the burner match, the unit may be receiving gas at a lower pressure than what is required for proper operation. A properly sized and adjusted gas supply is the responsibility of the licensed gas professional installing the gas supply for the burner. The ideal gas pressure for natural gas installations is 7 in. WC and for propane installations it is 11 in. WC. These pressures should be measured while the unit is in operation per Pg. 15 of the CF-DSI Manual by a licensed gas professional. Contact OGC for more information.

Why does my burner light but go out after 15-30 seconds?

For hard-piped installations: the first time the unit is operating, there may be air in the plumbing that needs to purge before there is gas present at the burner. Try cycling the unit ON and OFF a few times. Next, ensure that burner media is evenly dispersed across the burner surface and that only the OGC-supplied amount of media is being used. There should also be one layer of media inside the wind guard underneath the igniter and sensor electrode.

Finally, visually inspect the igniter and sensor electrodes for damage. After burner has completely cooled, wiggle all three prongs of the electrode assembly gently with your fingers; the prongs should not move. Ensure that a visible and audible spark is occurring between the middle electrode and the electrode that the middle electrode bends towards. Also verify that the spark gap is between 1/8” and ¼”. If problem persists, contact OGC for further assistance.

Why does my DSI system work normally sometimes but sometimes it shuts down after 15-20 minutes?

​​​​​​Depending on ambient conditions and installation location, the system may be shutting down unexpectedly due to unsafe conditions (turbulent or high winds or heavy rain). The system is constantly monitoring the presence of a flame and has a 12-second re-ignition before the unit shuts down when a flame is not being sensed by the control module.

If turbulent winds and heavy rain are not present when the unit is shutting down unexpectedly, ensure that burner media is evenly dispersed across the burner surface and that only the OGC-supplied amount of media is being used. There should also be one layer of media inside the wind guard underneath the igniter and sensor electrode. Then, visually inspect the igniter and sensor electrodes for damage. After burner has completely cooled, wiggle all three prongs of the electrode assembly gently with your fingers; the prongs should not move. Ensure that a visible and audible spark is occurring between the middle electrode and the electrode that the middle electrode bends towards. Also verify that the spark gap is between 1/8” and ¼”. If problem persists, contact OGC for further assistance.

Why is my burner making a gurgling noise when it is operating?

​​​​​​If a protective cover (burner cover and/or fire pit cover) is not being used when the unit is not in operation, it is possible that heavy rains have caused water to enter the burner flex-line. Allow the unit to operate for 30 minutes. If problem persists or if burner is not operating properly, contact OGC for further assistance.

Why is my burner noisy or whistling?

A gentle “whooshing” sound is normal when the unit is in operation. This is a result of the gas moving at very high speeds through the plumbing. When the “whooshing” noise is excessive or is more of a whistle, this may be a sign of a problem. Natural gas installations are more susceptible to noise, based on the physical properties of the gas. As a result of these properties, 2.5 times the amount of gas needs to travel through the plumbing to supply the same amount of heat in the same amount of time as a comparable propane burner. This means that the gas is traveling faster through the plumbing and creating more potential noise. Ensure that there are no kinks or damage to the supplied burner flex-line. Some plumbing components, such as commercially available corrugated stainless steel connectors, can cause excess noise when they are used as part of the gas supply system. Changes to the gas supply should only be made by a licensed gas professional. Contact OGC for more information.

Why is my gas burner not lighting?

Your burner may not be lighting for a few potential reasons. First, verify that there is power being supplied to the system. Check that outlets are live or batteries are fresh and that all wiring connections are made properly and securely on the DSI system. Next, verify that gas is being supplied to the burner. Ensure that all shutoff valves on the gas supply are open or that your propane tank is full. For hard-piped installations, the first time the unit is operating there may be air in the plumbing that needs to purge before there is gas present at the burner. Try cycling the unit ON and OFF a few times.

Next, ensure that burner media is evenly dispersed across the burner surface and that only the OGC-supplied amount of media is being used. There should also be one layer of media inside the wind guard underneath the igniter and sensor electrode. Finally, visually inspect the igniter and sensor electrodes for damage. Wiggle all three prongs of the electrode assembly  gently with your fingers; the prongs should not move. Ensure that a visible and audible spark is occurring between the middle electrode and the electrode that the middle electrode bends towards. Also verify that the spark gap is between 1/8” and ¼”. If problem persists, contact OGC for further assistance.